A recent study demonstrating the usefulness of amniotic products in knee arthritis

 A Randomized Controlled Single-Blind Study Demonstrating Superiority of Amniotic Suspension Allograft Injection Over Hyaluronic Acid and Saline Control for Modification of Knee Osteoarthritis Symptoms.

 

Jack Farr 1 , Andreas H Gomoll 2 , Adam B Yanke 3 , Eric J Strauss 4 , Katie C Mowry 5 , ASA Study Group Farr J, Gomoll AH, Yanke AB, Strauss EJ, Mowry KC; ASA Study Group. J Knee Surg. 2019 Nov;32(11):e2. doi: 10.1055/s-0039-3402742. Epub 2020 Jan 6. PMID: 31905410

A recent landmark study demonstrating the usefulness of (non-cellular) amniotic products in the treatment of knee arthritis. K. Cunningham MD austinothobio.com

Abstract:

Placental-derived tissues are a known source of anti-inflammatory and immune modulating factors. Published pilot data on amniotic suspension allograft (ASA) for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) demonstrated safety and trends for improved pain and function. A multicenter randomized controlled trial was designed to evaluate the efficacy of symptom modulation with ASA compared with saline and hyaluronic acid (HA) in subjects with knee OA. A total of 200 subjects were randomized 1:1:1 to ASA, HA, or saline, with subjects blinded to their allocation. Changes from baseline of patient-reported outcomes (PROs)-EQ-5D-5L, Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), visual analog scale (VAS), Tegner, and Single Assessment Numerical Evaluation (SANE)-were compared between groups. Patients reporting unacceptable pain at 3 months were considered treatment failures and withdrawn from the study. Statistical analysis was completed by comparing changes in PROs from baseline to 3 and 6 months for all groups. Comparison of demographics between treatment groups showed no significant differences between groups. Patients reporting unacceptable pain at 3 months in each group were ASA (13.2%), HA (68.8%), and saline (75%). Patients receiving ASA demonstrated significantly greater improvements from baseline for overall pain (VAS), KOOS pain, and KOOS-activities of daily living scores compared with those in the HA group (3 months) and both groups (6 months). ASA patients had significantly greater improvements in KOOS symptom scores compared with HA and saline at 3 and 6 months, respectively. OMERACTOARSI responder rates for ASA, HA, and saline groups were 69.1, 39.1, and 42.6%, respectively (p = 0.0007). Subjects receiving ASA treatment showed greater improvements in PROs and fewer patients reported unacceptable pain compared with HA and saline. The evidence presented in this Level I Randomized Controlled Trial suggests that ASA injection is an effective treatment for the nonoperative management of symptomatic knee OA. Thieme Medical Publishers.

 

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Author
Dr. Kelly Cunningham Physician

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Biologics Alliance Summit & Think Tank

Dr. Kelly Cunningham attended the 1st Biologics Alliance Summit in Carlsbad, California this past February. The agenda was educational, innovative and developmental of new approaches and collaborations.